Views
1 year ago

RideFast Magazine March 2020

  • Text
  • Ridefast
  • Motogp
  • Racing
  • Honda
  • Yamaha
  • Bikes
  • Factory
  • Kawasaki
  • Rider
  • Ducati

EXCLUSIVE LOCAL TEST:

EXCLUSIVE LOCAL TEST: 2020 BMW S1000RR LETHAL WEAPON 1&2 BMW S1000RR: STANDARD VS RACE TRIM 32 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE MARCH 2020

In this issue of RideFast, Robert Portman had the opportunity to ride Lance Isaac’s National-spec BMW S1000RR race bike kitted with everything our minds can imagine, and things much brighter minds can imagine also. Before we turn the pages to peruse the written form of his eyes popping out of his head, Donovan Fourie spent a day at Red Star Raceway with both a “standard” version of BMW’s latest superbike incarnation, plus a more “reasonably” kitted-out one from the fellows at World Of Carbon. Effectively, we move from good, to better, to best. Let’s start with the good – herewith from Donovan: Words: Donovan Fourie | Pics: Beam Productions “Standard” BMW S1000RR Well, we say “standard” because it is road-legal and left the factory in this trim. But manufacturers have cottoned on to the idea that people don’t want what is technically “standard” and find that their minds are more at ease when said factory bolts on all their batsh*t crazy go-fast bits. Thus we should make a distinction between “standard” and “base”. This is standard, but it has an entire catalogue of BMW’s newlyadopted M-parts vomited over it and therefore is galaxies away from “base”. If you don’t believe us, observe: It has the optional M Package complete with carbon wheels, the lighter M battery, the M seat with harder padding and a nonslip cover, an M tail and a “WSBK” M swing-arm with a different pivot. And this is the outward glance – inwardly, there is a host of added electronic trickery with three Race Pro riding modes, a launch control, a pitlane limiter, engine brake control, hill-start control pro, dynamic brake control and slide control. After all that, if you feel as though your overheating brain has exceeded melting point, take a moment to sympathise with Rob and me, standing disconsolately in the pits of Red Star as we flipped through the seemingly infinite onslaught of options on the TFT dash. After various phone calls and committee meetings, we eventually reached an electronic compromise that will suit our simple track needs and set forth down pitlane. Obviously, this is without the pitlane limiter working on account of it not being included in the understanding settlement. We are sure it works terrifically, though. At the beginning of last year sometime, RideFast attended the tedious world launch of this model in some scummy country at the bottom of Europe on some lousy race track – the adjectives contained in the RIDEFAST MAGAZINE MARCH 2020 33