Views
10 months ago

RideFast Magazine April 2020 issue

  • Text
  • Tyre
  • Racing
  • Tyres
  • Rider
  • Yamaha
  • Ducati
  • Bikes
  • Honda
  • April
  • Ridefast

ULTIMATE BIKES NEED

ULTIMATE BIKES NEED ULTIMATE RUBBER. When we do tests like this on very expensive, high powered, demanding machines we like to fit them with tyres that can handle them all and have a proven track record of doing so. That’s why we got hold of Pirelli and asked if we could have all the bikes fitted with their Diablo SuperCorsa race rubber. They happily came on board supplying us with a new set of SC2 front and rear tyres for all the machines. Now we knew we would be able to test the bikes to the max and not have to worry about grip levels. “Today, we ride motorcycles that are pushing as much as 50 horsepower more than the 500cc Grand Prix bikes we worshipping at the time. Hell, they are close to what Rossi’s tyre-smoking Honda RC211V MotoGP machine pushed in 2003. They are also adorned with better suspension, greater frame know-how and electronic technology that was deemed space-aged when Rossi wore Repsol colours.” If you don’t believe us, cast your mind back to a motorcycle your rode in your younger days; for me, this would portal me to the late 90s and early 2000s, riding bikes like the Kawasaki ZX-7RR, the 1998 Yamaha R1, the 2001 Suzuki GSXR1000 and similar. At the time, they defied everything Newton had worked so hard to define. The human mind was hardly capable of grasping such forces, taming such savagery and preventing various organs from atomising. Go ride one of those machines now. Actually, please don’t. It will ruin your childhood and leave you emotionally scarred. We remember them as boundary-pushers, however, these days they are slow, clunky, clumsy and a little bit boring. This epiphany might be harsh, but it is true nonetheless. Today, we ride motorcycles that are pushing as much as 50 horsepower more than the 500cc Grand Prix bikes we worshipping at the time. Hell, they are close to what Rossi’s tyre-smoking Honda RC211V MotoGP machine pushed in 2003. They are also adorned with better suspension, greater frame know-how and electronic technology that was deemed space-aged when Rossi wore Repsol colours. Six such examples of modern motorcycling marvels sat angrily in the pits of Red Star Raceway. They were all adorned with the same Pirelli Supercorsa tyres and were ready to spend the day hauling in vague circles for the sake of finding out how they stack up against each other. Included in that half dozen was the first public appearance of Honda’s 2020 Fireblade, both the standard model and the SP, and the new bold-faced Yamaha R1. Questions about the exclusion of the standard Ducati Panigale V4 and the Aprilia RSV4 Factory might be explained by the fact that they are 1100cc and that, mathematicians agree, is not a litre. The Litre And Some 1100cc Games is not a catchy title. Not that there’s any shortage of esteemed motorcycle brilliance in the lineup presented. The old days were good but the new days are much, much better. Over the next 29 pages we will bring you all that is good, and not so good with all 6 bikes. We will also show you the facts and figures we have put together so that you can decide for yourself, and try and figure out which bike we think is the best “New Gen” around. Helping us as always fit the new Pirelli rubber to these expensive machines was one of the most trusted fitment centres in the business, and one that has won many awards over the years including top Pirelli dealer. We sent the bikes off to Bike Tyre Warehouse in Midrand for expert and very careful treatment. We could not afford one scratch on these bikes whilst the tyres were being fitted and taken off after the test, and we are happy top report that not one scratch or hiccup was had in the entire process. Big thanks to Bruce and the team from BTW. 34 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE APRIL 2020 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE APRIL 2020 3 5