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9 months ago

RideFast Jan 2020

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  • Rossi
  • Honda
  • Yamaha
  • Motogp
  • Ducati
  • Lorenzo
  • January
  • Rider
  • Ridefast
  • Racing

The standard machine

The standard machine pushes 199 hp and has a wet weight of 199 kg making it a neat 1:1 power-to-weight ratio. It also has every electronic trick in the book, the suspension is commendable efforts from KYB and the tyres are good for achieving mileage on the road plus offer something relating to sporty grip. The exact machine we had is the day-to-day machine of Yamaha ambassador and Soweto Motorcycle School owner Alfred “King Donut” Matamela, and is completely standard apart from a slip-on can that makes in a tiny bit lighter and does very little to the power output, and a Maverick Vinales signature. Clint’s bike, on the other hand, is quite different. It started life as a standard R1, but after much fettling by Aer-O-Cannon it now has Ohlins gas front fork cartridges, an Ohlins TTX shock, a blue printed motor, an Akrapovic full exhaust system, a YEC ECU flash, a Rapid Bike Evo fuelling module, a Sprint racing filter, shorter racing gearing, Metzeler Racetech K0 tyres and about a 15kg drop in weight with the racing fairing and the removal parts not needed for racing. The total cost of everything is R350,000. The say that if you want to make a small fortune in racing, start with a big one and wait… Is this fortune of high-tech tuning worth the massive lightening of Clint’s wallet? That’s what we are finding out. For our Fast Laps we have an anonymous racer that we use as a shameless copy of The Stig. No one knows who he is, even though he has the build of Dino Iozzo, the style of Dino Iozzo, the look of Dino Iozzo, says he’s Dino Iozzo and it says Dino Iozzo on his ID book. We have no idea who this strange racer is and his identity will never be revealed. “The standard machine pushes 199 hp and has a wet weight of 199 kg making it a neat 1:1 power-to-weight ratio. It also has every electronic trick in the book, the suspension is commendable efforts from KYB and the tyres are good for achieving mileage on the road plus offer something relating to sporty grip. “ So Not-Dino Iozzo first climbed aboard Alfred’s standard R1 and lined up at the start line of our special version of Red Star (we use the second loop of Red Star, partially because it has the perfect mix of corner types and straights but, more importantly, it’s less to shoot than the full track). Not- Dino has been riding nothing but race bikes his entire life, and found himself confronted with the full horror of a bike designed to wrap up miles on the highway and not just go around corners. He did the lap, and it looked fast with much sideways action, but some conversing afterwards revealed that he felt out of place, strange and a bit awkward. The suspension was too soft and didn’t dampen properly, the gearing was all wrong, the fuelling was off and the tyres felt like they were made out of concrete. Still, he achieved a commendable time around our easy-to-film track of 1:29.00. Then he threw his leg over Clint’s race bike, and looked happier the moment he left pitlane. Much of this is down to the suspension that is stiffer to offer better support under harsh braking, leaning and acceleration, plus is able to deal with the fine ripples that become a whoops section when pushed too far. The flashed ECU and Rapid Bike module mean the throttle has been opened without the fly-by-wire system trying to save fuel or make the rider safer, and the fuelling makes the bike not only push more power but also feel smoother for better throttle control. This is all needed, especially because the Akrapovic exhaust and Sprint filter will serious alter the standard mapping, “He did the lap, and it looked fast with much sideways action, but some conversing afterwards revealed that he felt out of place, strange and a bit awkward.” 36 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020 RIDEFAST MAGAZINE JANUARY 2020 37